Last Updated
07 April, 2005
 

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UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Installing the 3SGTE
 

  Like the Rebuild section, the following pages do not describe the process for installing a stock (or relatively stock) 3S-GTE motor. Many of the stock components have been entirely replaced on this motor, such as the turbo system, wiring, ignition, ECU, etc.

If you are looking to install a mostly stock 3S-GTE, then the best course might be reversing the steps in the Removal section.

One of the biggest challenges for this project was finding mounting locations for all of the aftermarket components. Adding a few things like a catch can, BOV, etc., isn't too much trouble on a basically stock motor. However, I had to find a home for about ten new pieces, and that proved difficult.

The other major issue was fabricating an intake plumbing system from scratch. This is a challenge, as a trial-and-error approach can ruin your wallet.
 
 
  With the motor out, I removed the intercooler, which I was replacing with my Greddy unit. I also removed the clutch slave cylinder, as I was replacing the stock hose with an SS hose from Club MR2.

I removed the other accessories and took the time to clean the engine bay. There were some areas where the paint had chipped off the sealant, and others where some type of black paint or undercoating had been applied, but otherwise it was clean:
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  I installed the Greddy intercooler from my previous MR2. First an adapter panel is placed in the opening, as there is no duct between the I/C and the body as in the OEM install. Then the I/C is installed using two of the original mounting locations:
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  Once the I/C is in place, the stainless fan shroud is installed, with the fan already in place:
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NOTE: The Greddy intercooler kit includes neither the fan shroud nor the fan. I got my shroud from Manjit Gosal and my fan from Tripac.
 
 
  After getting the sludge out of the coolant overflow tank (coffee pot cleaner works well), I reinstalled it, using the three 12mm bolts on the lower mount points:
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The upper mount was left unattached for now.
 
 
  Three radiator hoses were getting replaced while I had such easy access within the engine bay. Toyota calls them Radiator Hose No. 1 or Inlet (16571-74140), No. 6 (16576-74010), and No. 7 (16558-74010).

Hose No. 6 connects two sections of stainless pipe:
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Some soapy water always helps with installing the hose in the proper alignment.
 
 
  Hose No. 1, also called the Inlet hose, connects one of the long coolant tubes under the car to the water pump inlet manifold. Since the motor was still out, I simply slipped the end of the hose onto the pipe without tightening the clamp. I'd snug it down after the other end was attached:
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  Hose No. 7 runs from a stainless "J" shaped tube to the coolant outlet manifold. I slid one end of the hose onto the pipe, aligning the the painted stripe with the paint mark on the tube:
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  I'd purchased brass shift cable bushings from Club MR2. Hopefully these would change the shifter action to something a bit more precise. The stock bushings are very squishy.

The new bushings are easy to install. Simply push the OEM bushings out with a screwdriver, then install the brass inserts and attach the "E" clip:
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  I installed a new fuel filter, and new crush washers on the lower banjo bolt. The top fitting was getting converted to aircraft SS hose, so I simply plugged it with a short length of silicone hose for now:
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  Next, I installed the two bolts that mount the lateral control rod, which is located just above the left-hand engine mount plate:
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Rotate the rod up against the inner wheel housing to keep it out of the way for now:
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The other end will eventually attach to the left-hand engine isolator.
 
 
  I had replaced the stock fuel pump with a Supra Twin turbo pump, as access to the fuel tank was a bit easier with the motor out. The main fuel filler hose had to be cut off, so I went ahead and replaced all of the tank hoses:
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As you can see, most of them are just " I.D. fuel hose.
 
 
  I removed the driveshaft bearing support from the old motor and attached it to the new motor:
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The support is aligned by two dowels. I applied some thread lock to the bolts and torqued them to BGB specs.
 
 
  Next comes a short brace from the bearing support to the alternator bracket:
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Note that this brace is very similar in size and shape to the engine mounting stay. However, it is beefier (feels like solid rod, not tubing) and the end that attaches to the alternator bracket is rounded to fit the cutout on the bracket.
 
 
  There's one more brace, a longer one that attaches to the engine block:
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With both braces in place, I applied some thread lock and torqued them to specs.
 
 
  I attached the motor to the hoist and detached it from the engine stand. I used a piece of 1" wooden dowel as a clutch alignment tool. I found that if you tap it into the engine block with a rubber mallet, it will stay in place during the assembly.

With the dowel in place, I slid the clutch disc on, with the "flat" side facing the flywheel and the raised hub section facing out towards the pressure plate. I then installed the pressure plate, which had been balanced as part of the crank & flywheel assembly:
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While keeping the dowel centered in the opening, I evenly tightened down the six bolts, and torqued them to spec.
 
 
  With the clutch installed, I lowered the motor onto a mechanic's creeper. Now I needed to attach the transmission, which was also on a creeper:
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The plastic sheeting on the creepers makes it much easier to reposition the pieces during assembly.
 
 
  I had trouble getting the transmission input shaft to slide into the clutch, wrangling with it for an hour or so. I started to think that the clutch, which was an RPS Sport clutch, might have been the wrong part. I hadn't test fitted the disk onto the input shaft to be sure. 

I had decided to remove the pressure plate and check the fitment when I noticed that the rubber dust boot that fits over the clutch release lever was exerting a slight pressure on the lever. As I jostled the transmission into position against the motor, it had enough springiness to slowly force the throwout bearing down the input shaft until it was mis-aligned, and the bearing would jam when the pieces were fitted together. I removed the dust boot, and the pieces slid together perfectly.
 
 
  With the engine and trans in place, I installed the three 17mm mounting bolts, and the two 14mm mounting bolts, and torqued them to spec with some thread lock. Here is the completed unit:
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Note that the left-hand isolator (the rubber & steel part of the mounting assembly) is already attached. Also note that the rear isolator is attached. You'll need to REMOVE the rear isolator, as it will get in the way as you raise the motor.
 
 
  I set the assembly down on a creeper and wheeled it into position under the engine bay:
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